Announcement: Buddhist Meditation-RELS 3396-Fall 17-University of Houston

 

Buddhist Meditation: Its Theory and Practice

Instructor: Dr. Trung Huynh (Rev. Thich Hang Dat)

Tuesday/Thursday, 10:00-11:30 AM; Room: M 119

RELS-3396, 3 Credits

______________________________________________________

Course Description 

This special course will:

• Examine briefly the Buddha’s life, his enlightenment through meditation, and his expounding of that meditative experience as one of his essential teachings in the Four Noble Truths and Eightfold Paths

• Appraise further various meditative techniques developed after his demise in Theravada and Mahayana traditions

• Survey various Buddhist meditative traditions in ancient and contemporary times.

• Examine briefly the Buddha’s life, his enlightenment through meditation, and his expounding of that meditative experience as one of his essential teachings in the Four Noble Truths and Eightfold Paths.

• Appraise further various meditative techniques developed after his demise in Theravada and Mahayana traditions • Survey various Buddhist meditative traditions in ancient and contemporary times.

 

Particularly, in this course students will:

• Acquire the necessary knowledge regarding the Theravada’s Samatha and Vipassana techniques such as meditation on the forty objects and the Four Foundation of Mindfulness practice.

• Know how to deal with mental hindrances and recognize the mental stages of achievements.

• Discover the Mahayana meditative tradition, including the sudden and gradual enlightenments, koan, contemplative case, hua-tou, just-sitting, and the Tiantai’s great concentration and insight.

• Understand the integration of the mantra recitation and visualization with some meditative traditions.

• Recognize the multidisciplinary applications of Buddhist meditation in modern health care, education, etc.

 

Course Goals

This course will:

• Enhance students’ knowledge of Buddhist Meditation.

• Refine students’ view about the Buddhist traditions, both from personal and sociological perspectives.

• Provide students the required comprehension to analyze, compare, and contrast the Buddhist Meditations in different localities.

• Offer students the indispensable knowledge of the connections between Buddhist Meditation and modern science, medicine, education, and other related areas.

 

Prerequisite: No special knowledge or consent required.

 

If you have questions about this course, please contact Dr. Trung Huynh (Rev. Thich Hang Dat) at thuynh32@uh.edu.